Meet the Leading Players in the Privacy Ecosystem: Sabina Jausovec-Salinas, Rackspace US

Over a hundred organizations are responsible for shaping the future of data privacy. In this continued series we’ll profile some of the organizations that are helping to shape the massive privacy ecosystem through the eyes of the professionals that work there and learn more about their perspectives on privacy.

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What is your organization’s role in the privacy ecosystem?

Rackspace helps businesses tap the power of hosting and cloud computing without the complexity and cost of managing it on their own. As a cloud computing and service company, Rackspace values the trust our customers place in our services.

Our role in the privacy ecosystem is to provide our customers with multi-cloud deployment options (public, private and hybrid cloud, and dedicated hosting) and to offer various security solutions and services to allow our customers to configure and deploy controls that can address their security and privacy compliance challenges.

Rackspace services are provided in a manner that gives our customers flexibility over how they configure, secure and deploy their hosted solution based on their unique requirements.

What key goals/issues is your organization focused on tackling?

Everything we have built at Rackspace has had service as its bedrock, so our primary goal is providing support and services that help our customers achieve their business goals. We serve customers in more than 120 countries and are committed to helping our customers protect the security and privacy of information stored or transferred when using our services.

In addition to providing multi-cloud deployment options, we also offer Rackspace Managed Security services for improved cyber security. Rackspace Managed Security services have been crafted to address the core challenges businesses face in keeping their cloud environments secure and compliant. These services enable our customers to proactively address threats to information security and implement monitoring and security controls to protect their data.

How have your organization’s goals/focus changed over the years to address evolving technologies or challenges?

Dangerous and sophisticated attacks are a daily challenge for security and privacy teams everywhere. This is the new normal. Rackspace is continuously improving its product and service portfolio to serve its customers’ workloads where they fit best and to address the new realities of evolving technologies and challenges that come with it, such as security threats and cyber-attacks.

Rackspace engineers deliver specialized expertise, easy-to-use tools, and Fanatical Support® for leading technologies including AWS, VMware, Microsoft, OpenStack and others, be it in Rackspace, customers’ or third-party data centers.

Rackspace provides solutions and services that help our customers in their own privacy compliance efforts. Rackspace Managed Security services include Cyber Security Operations Center services to help our customer effectively manage business risk by detecting and responding to security threats. This service adopts a proactive approach to detecting anomalous activity on customers’ networks and allowing our customers to respond quickly and effectively to malicious activity when it is detected.

How do you think the Privacy Ecosystem will/needs to evolve over the next 3-5 years to be fit for purpose?

In today’s digital economy, connectivity and the flow of information are becoming global. With the rapid development of information technology, modern ideas about privacy have changed. Digital technologies, like cloud computing and the Internet of Things, now have a direct impact on how we collect, access, use and protect information. Additionally, cross-border data flows are critical to the success of companies, as well as individual consumers who benefit from services that are delivered globally.

This globalization of business and social connectivity has caused the privacy landscape to grow in scope and complexity, and it's brought about new challenges for regulators, companies and privacy professionals. Companies must understand and continuously adapt to new technologies and individual country-specific privacy laws. Companies, regulators and privacy professionals will therefore need to work closer together to establish interoperable privacy frameworks to enable businesses to grow on a global level, while ensuring privacy rights of individuals are protected.

Tell us about your role at Rackspace.

As an in-house advertising and privacy counsel, I launched the Rackspace privacy program and manage multiple facets of the program. This includes, developing and implementing privacy policies, procedures and practices, providing subject matter expertise to other members of the legal team, training employees on privacy related matters, supporting Rackspace’s customer and supplier contract negotiations to address privacy implications, managing Safe Harbor/Privacy Shield and APEC CBPRs assessments and certifications, and providing guidance to the business on other privacy and data protection related matters.

How did you start working in the privacy field and why do you enjoy it?

I started working in the privacy field when I first joined Rackspace in the UK in 2008. Privacy issues can be fascinating and multifaceted. For companies with a global presence, managing privacy compliance has become increasingly complex and challenging. And this is the reason why I enjoy working in the privacy field. The way we think about privacy today is not only important for us as individuals. It is also important for businesses that collect and use personal information. Privacy professionals in today’s world have a huge responsibility and an opportunity to influence the way personal data is handled and the way privacy rights are respected. We can help drive product and service development with privacy in mind.

What do you wish more [people, business, etc.] knew about privacy?

There is a notion that storing personal data in the cloud will diminish its privacy. This myth is mainly due to a lack of understanding of the cloud. How you utilize the cloud matters when it comes to privacy and security of your data. When it comes to the use of cloud services, one size does not fit all. The best solution is often a multi-cloud approach – different clouds for different applications, workloads, and data. Adequate assessment and planning can help businesses make smart cloud decisions and select a reputable cloud provider and the right cloud deployment model. This can enable better data privacy, security and control in the cloud.

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To learn about other unique privacy insights from privacy leaders, check out the profiles listed at the end of this blog post: Privacy Ecosystem Series.

Privacy Ecosystem Series Review

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There are many players in the privacy ecosystem. From regulatory agencies to law firms to technology companies – and each entity plays an essential role in managing the balance between business use of data and consumer data protection.

We began the Privacy Ecosystem Series in July to showcase some of the many people and organizations involved in this fast growing ecosystem. Players range from organizations that enact new regulations to innovators who create compliance management solutions for businesses, and solutions for consumers to manage their privacy preferences.

Check out the Privacy Ecosystem Map to see just how many organizations are involved in shaping data privacy.

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Meet the Leading Players in the Privacy Ecosystem: Nuala O’Connor, President & CEO, Center for Democracy & Technology

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Over a hundred organizations are responsible for shaping the future of data privacy. In this new series we’ll profile some of the organizations that are helping to shape the massive privacy ecosystem through the eyes of the professionals that work there and learn more about their perspectives on privacy.

 

How have your organization's goals/focus changed over the years to address evolving technologies or challenges?

CDT’s overall goals have not fundamentally changed over the years. Instead, we’re actually closer to our founding values, which – at their core – have a profound respect for the individual, their personal experience online and their right to speak freely.

New technology emerges every day, and we’re applying the same lens of respecting individual’s dignity to this technology – from drones and audio beacons to the myriad of ways that the Internet of Things (or the Internet of Everything) both makes decisions about individuals and helps to make life more full and efficient.

I think that CDT has evolved in its desire to speak to all members of the community –governments, companies, and individuals – to bring them to the table to discuss respecting human rights online. If anything, CDT’s focus has grown to be more global: we realize that when change to legislation is made in one country, it will have a global ripple effect; we understand the Internet to be global and that global policy must be applied to it; and we believe that the Internet is the greatest loudspeaker ever created.

 

What is the biggest threat to consumers?

The biggest threat to consumers is the opaque collection of data, by which I mean the little bits of data you give out every second of your life and don’t realize.

It’s not the transmission of data – like when you do a Google search or when you’re on Facebook – because you know what data you’re inputting. It’s the data that’s extraneous to the transaction, which includes data that’s collected when you walk down the street or into a store.

The ability to collect granular data about you inside of your own home is a relatively new phenomenon and it stymies notions of your curtilage, your physical boundary around your home. What’s concerning about this data, not only how it’s collected or used by companies you may or may not know, is that decisions are made about you as a result of this data, and you may not be aware whether these decisions are fair, accurate, lasting, or could change how you access services, credit or information.

So it’s not just the data that concerns me but it’s these decisions that may not be at all transparent or apparent to the individual, and they have less control or power in its collection and use.

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Meet the Leading Players in the Privacy Ecosystem: Cooper Quintin, Staff Technologist, Electronic Frontier Foundation

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Over a hundred organizations are responsible for shaping the future of data privacy. In this new series we’ll profile some of the organizations that are helping to shape the massive privacy ecosystem through the eyes of the professionals that work there and learn more about their perspectives on privacy. 

 

What is the role of Privacy Badger in the privacy ecosystem?

Privacy Badger is a browser extension for the Chrome and Firefox that blocks third party trackers which try to spy on your reading habits online. Instead of relying on a blacklist like most other tracker blocking software, Privacy Badger determines what is tracking you as you browse and automatically blocks any new trackers that it sees. Privacy Badger works in conjunction with EFF's DNT policy–a document that websites can post which contains a promise to not track users who have sent the “Do Not Track” header (which Privacy Badger does.) If a domain has posted the DNT Policy, Privacy Badger will not block it.

 

What key goals/issues is Privacy Badger focused on tackling?

The key goal of Privacy Badger is to bring an end to non-consensual tracking as the primary business model for the web. Through a combination of the DNT Policy and Privacy Badger we would like to encourage content providers and ad tech companies to shift away from a business model that relies on tracking and toward one that protects individuals' privacy. We can do that by rewarding the companies that protect individual privacy and blocking the ones that don't.

 

How have EFF's goals/focus as an organization changed over the years to address evolving technologies or challenges?

EFF has always been a staunch supporter of civil liberties and the right to privacy. Early on, we were a part of the W3C Do Not Track Working Group. We tried to help steer that group in a direction that would result in a strong DNT policy. We felt that the results of that working group were unsatisfactory in that they did not go far enough in protecting the users. We then switched focus to creating our own stronger version of the DNT policy, and the technology–Privacy Badger–to back it up.

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Meet the Leading Players in the Privacy Ecosystem: David Longford, CEO, DataGuidance

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Over a hundred organizations are responsible for shaping the future of data privacy. In this new series we’ll profile some of the organizations that are helping to shape the massive privacy ecosystem through the eyes of the professionals that work there and learn more about their perspectives on privacy.  

 

What is your organization’s role in the privacy ecosystem?

DataGuidance is a hub of data privacy intelligence, sourced from the world's most renowned experts in 170+ countries. Our role in the privacy ecosystem is to be the global centre for information on privacy, whether it's giving access to relevant laws, local ‘best-practice' or allowing people to compare requirements in multiple jurisdictions.

 

What key goals/issues is your organization focused on tackling?

The primary goal is giving first-class support to privacy teams, which we know can be hugely diverse. They need the best information possible, so it is a huge responsibility. We talk to the privacy community all the time, so that we can deliver information and innovative tools that help people solve the day-to-day issues they face.

We’ve been hearing a lot from our clients regarding the practical difficulties they’ve been facing with regards to employee monitoring. As a result, we did a lot work around this and developed a specific tool to help privacy pros understand the legal requirements they are faced with. It's an issue that touches a nerve with everyone, as there are so many valid and complex needs to satisfy from each stakeholder. For me, it’s an issue that embodies privacy's importance to businesses, societies and citizens, so it’s crucial we all get it right.

Aside from that, probably the biggest on the horizon is the GDPR, how organisations can compare EU and global requirements; we've got lots of very exciting plans for that. In addition, we continually see issues surrounding data transfers, breach notification, direct marketing, data retention and consent; the list goes on!

 

How have your organization’s goals/focus changed over the years to address evolving technologies or challenges?

We're living through an incredible period, in terms of how technology is changing the world. One major consequence of technological change that I've noticed over the last few years is how businesses speak about customer experience. Like the best internet companies, we put a huge focus on making sure people get value every time they login to DataGuidance.

Technology is constantly driving up expectations; the fact that people have 24/7 access to apps with fantastic functionality mean that our own product needs to constantly evolve. In short, today’s privacy professionals expect to quickly find valuable information that helps them do their job better.

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